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Cameroon – Tragedies: These disasters that are still awaiting the results of investigations prescribed by Paul Biya

Written by Deckson N.

Despite the “lifting of doubt” about the reasons for the railway drama of October 21, 2016, the mystery remains on the reasons for a dozen dramas, dating for some more than 20 years ago.

In its publication of Monday May 29, 2017, the daily newspaper Le Messager remembers among others the drama of Lake Nyos. The explosion had killed 1800 one night in August 1986 from a gas emission. A highly toxic cloud had spread and hundreds of people in the perimeter lost their lives by asphyxiation. At that time, the Cameroonian Government had forbidden the survivors to return to live on the shores of the lake.

Two years earlier, 1984, a so-called limnic irruption in the scientific garden caused the loss of 37 lives.

On Saturday, February 14, 1998, in a suburb of Yaoundé called Nsam, tank cars of the Cameroonian Company of Depots petroleum (SCDP) accidentally reversed on the rails. A fire broke out on the spot and killed 250 Cameroonians. In this drama, hundreds of wounded and families marked for life, the newspaper reports. 66 families struck by the tragedy received nearly CFAF 2 billion in compensation for their dismantling of the security perimeter of the SCDP repository.

In Mbanga Mpongo, 114 people lost their lives on the night of 4-5 May 2007 in a plane crash, the newspaper also recalls. The Boeing 737-800 that took off from Douala International Airport around midnight local time was traveling to Nairobi, Kenya. Despite the reserves of the control tower over time, the pilot of Kenya Airways has committed to take off, reads the daily.

These and other tragedies known on Cameroonian soil have not yet seen the results of the respective investigations published. Especially that of the crazy train that killed ten people in Etoudi, in Yaounde; The explosion of the Cartouchière of the headquarters of the defense forces of Yaoundé, among others.

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Deckson N.